Undergraduate programs in economics

Each of our economics programs gives students a foundation for analyzing economic phenomena, understanding how economies work and assessing economic policy proposals. Graduates are well prepared for a variety of opportunities including graduate programs (medical school, law school, business school) and careers involving economic analysis.

Degree programs


Alumnus Dan Kreutzjans, data scientist for General Motors

This degree taught me both theoretical and applied economics for my role as a data scientist. M.A. in economics also gave me the advantage of understanding econometric techniques for causal inference; an area that is growing in data science.

"I was beginning to find my career passion after being in the workforce for several years. My passion was in the field of data science and machine learning. My undergraduate degree in economics allowed me to enter this field but I began to see the limitations of only having a bachelor's degree in such a quantitative industry. Having a career and a family, my options for higher education were limited to mostly M.B.A. programs. As I prepared for the M.B.A. applications, I was referred to the M.A. economics program at Wayne State. This program was interesting from the beginning due to the structure of the courses to accommodate working individuals. This became a tremendous opportunity to have the ability to pursue a quantitative academic degree vs. a professional one. This was so appealing because senior-level data science positions would often require a master's degree in fields such as statistics, economics, math, and other quantitative disciplines. Overall the M.A. in economics has changed my career possibilities in a competitive and ever-changing industry."

Alumna Kathryn Ramsey, data analyst for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan

With a strong, diverse, and renowned faculty and curriculum, the M.A. in health economics from Wayne State in Detroit has been a cornerstone for my academic and professional career.

"Tough problems are complex and interdisciplinary. To solve them, we need an education that teaches us how to measure short-term impacts, analyze long-term direction, and connect ideas together to find Pareto-optimal solutions for the future. With an undergraduate degree in Information Systems and an entry-level position at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, my personal expertise was in database management and systems design -- not the United States healthcare market or economics. With a strong, diverse, and renowned faculty and curriculum, the M.A. in health economics from Wayne State in Detroit has been a cornerstone for my academic and professional career."