Fall 2021 course offerings

Share

1000 level 

LIN 1850 Introductory Symbolic Logic

WEB

Instructor: Susan Vineburg

The logic of propositions; the general logic of predicates and relations. 

LIN 1860 Introductory Symbolic Logic Honors

WEB

Instructor: Susan Vineburg

The logic of propositions; the general logic of predicates and relations. Honors Credit


2000 level

LIN 2720 (CI) Basic Concepts in Linguistics 

MW 1:00-2:15pm 

Synchronous

Instructor: Petr Staroverov

Analysis of the structure and use of language, focusing on English, from the standpoint of current linguistic practice. Topics include: phonetics and sound structure, word structure, syntax, semantics, language origin and history, dialects, language learning, animal communication, and language in social interaction.

LIN 2720 Basic Concepts in Linguistics

TR 1:00-2:15pm

ARR

Instructor: Stephen Pobutsky

Analysis of the structure and use of language, focusing on English, from the standpoint of current linguistic practice. Topics include: phonetics and sound structure, word structure, syntax, semantics, language origin and history, dialects, language learning, animal communication, and language in social interaction.


3000 Level

LIN 3080 Cognitive Psychology: Fundamental Processes

TR 11:30-12:45pm

Synchronous

Instructor: Lara Jones

Fundamental theories, concepts, and empirical findings in study of human cognition. Topics include: thinking, problem solving, language comprehension and production, memory and attention.

LIN 3310 Language and Culture

TR 11:30-12:45pm

ARR

Instructor: Stephen Chrisomalis

An introduction to linguistic anthropology. Using comparative approaches to language and culture across time and space, explore variation and change, cognitive dimensions of language, language evolution, linguistic myths, and the use of language in social practice. 


5000 Level

LIN 5050 Advanced Symbolic Logic

MW 4:30-6:10pm

ARR

Instructor: Eric Hiddleston

Formal, extensive treatment of first-order predicate logic with emphasis on the notions of a formal logical language and truth in a model; the logic of identity; definite descriptions; brief introductions to set theory and the metatheory of propositional and first-order logic; some additional advanced topics to be selected by the instructor. 

LIN 5080 Phonetics

R 6:00-8:30pm

ARR

Instructor: TBD

Multisensory study of sounds in the English language, emphasizing acoustic, physiologic, kinesiologic approaches.

LIN 5230 Structure of Arabic

TR 5:30-6:45pm 

ARR

Instructor: Muhammad al-Sharkawi

Survey of historical constitution and theoretical structure of Arabic.

LIN 5300/ENG 5740 Syntax

Thursday, 5:30-8:00pm

ARR

Instructor: Ljiljana Progovac

The course examines the structure of phrases and sentences using the framework of one of the most recent approaches to syntax, the Minimalist Program. The goal of the theory is not only to discover various subconscious principles and rules that make up grammars of all human languages, but also to express these rules in the most economical terms possible. This class is required of all Linguistics majors, minors, and MA students.  

LIN ENG 5700; HON 4280: Introduction to Linguistic Theory

Tuesday, 5:30-8:00pm

ARR

Instructor: Ljiljana Progovac

This course is an introduction to the formal, scientific study of human language, the purpose of which is to account for our unconscious knowledge of language rules. It is concerned with three primary linguistic levels of structure: the level of sounds (phonetics and phonology), the level of words (morphology), and the level of phrases and sentences (syntax). Furthermore, we will examine how meaning is computed at these different levels (semantics), incorporating some basic notions of logic and philosophy, as well as how these levels are acquired by children (language acquisition), incorporating some basic developmental milestones, intersecting with those studied in psychology. Classes will consist of lecture, discussion, and problem-solving sessions involving a wide sample of languages, cutting across a variety of cultures.

LIN 5715 Morphology

W 5:30-8:00pm

ARR

Instructor: Petr Staroverov

Morphology is a core area of Linguistics. The course will introduce the basic issues in the study of the internal structure of words, as well as the analytical techniques applied to morphological analysis. Students will learn how to analyze words of various (Indo-European and non-Indo-European) languages into morphemes, as well as to recognize morphological patterns and to utilize theoretical concepts in order to describe and analyze such patterns. In particular, the course will develop a theory of morphology in generative grammar, paying special attention to the question of whether particular morphological phenomena are primarily syntactic or primarily phonological in nature

LIN 5730 English Grammar

R 5:30-8:00pm

ARR

Instructor: Stephen Pobutsky

Comprehensive analysis of English sentence structure and parts of speech using the terminology and descriptive approach of traditional grammar

LIN 5993 (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Linguistics

ARR

Instructor: Ljiljana Progovac

Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a corequisite course; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement. Intensive training in literature search, linguistic analysis, and the preparation of scholarly written work. Required for all majors.

LIN 5993 (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Linguistics- Honors

ARR

Instructor: Ljiljana Progovac

Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a corequisite course; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement. Intensive training in literature search, linguistic analysis, and the preparation of scholarly written work. Required for all majors. Honors Credit


6000 Level

LIN 6720 Tpcs Lang: Historical Linguistics

TR 4:00-5:15pm

T in-person / R online

Instructor: Martha Ratliff

This course is an introduction to the field of historical linguistics. Historical linguistics is concerned with language in its dynamic state, and its object of study is language change at every structural level: its causes, its pathways, and its outcomes. We will pay special attention to the roles language variation and contact between languages play in language change. We will also learn the techniques of linguistic reconstruction. Controversies around how language relationships are determined and how family trees are constructed will be discussed. Grades will be based on weekly assignments and a term paper. Required: an introductory course in linguistics or consent of the instructor. Recommended: ENG 5710/LIN 5290 Phonology.


7000 Level

LIN 7720 Advanced Studies: African American Vernacular English: history and structure

M 5:00-7:30pm

ARR

Instructor: Walter Edwards

This course will examine the linguistic, sociolinguistic, historical, cultural, and educational aspects of AAVE and its speakers. The course will begin with a review of the literature concerning the historical origins of the variety. To that end, we will discuss whether or not AAVE has its linguistic roots in African languages, English dialects, or evolved independently. For evidence in this debate, we will review extant records of 18th and 19th century written and spoken AAVE. A significant part of this course will be devoted to describing the linguistic rules inherent in present-day AAVE and comparing those rules to Standard American English, Caribbean creoles, African languages and southern White vernacular English. We will also discuss differences and similarities among dialects of AAVE (e.g. Gullah, Texas, Detroit, Atlanta). The principal outcome of these discussions will be to establish that AAVE is a legitimate linguistic variety with systematic links to other recognized languages.

The course will also address such sociolinguist matters as code-switching and style-shifting between AAVE and Standard English, and how and when AAVE is used to index racial, cultural and social solidarity. We will also study the use of AAVE in such pop genres as hip-hop and comedy. Finally, we will discuss how AAVE is treated in the classroom in the USA and what pedagogical approaches are recommended by experts for teaching Standard English to AAVE speakers without questioning the legitimacy of AAVE.

Expected outcomes of the course include a clear understanding of the history and linguistic structure of AAVE, and an appreciation of the cultural and sociolinguistic richness and complexity of the variety.

LIN 7991 Directed Study in Linguistics

ARR

Instructor: Ljiljana Progovac

LIN 7999 Masters Essay Direction

ARR

Instructor: Ljiljana Progovac

Back to listing