Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Philosophy

Students may satisfy the Major in either of two ways: with a Traditional Concentration or with a Foundations of Law and Ethics Concentration.
 

Core Course 

All students of either concentration must take one of the following courses in symbolic logic: PHI 2850 (Introductory Symbolic Logic), PHI 2860 (Honors Introductory Symbolic Logic), or PHI 5050 (Advanced Symbolic Logic).
 

Traditional Concentration

The Traditional Concentration is primarily intended for those students whose interests in Philosophy are broad and general, and for those who are considering doing graduate-level work in Philosophy.

A candidate pursuing this concentration must complete a minimum of nine (9) courses in Philosophy, including the Core Course in symbolic logic (see above) and the following courses or selections from course groups:

(1) Two courses from the History of Philosophy Group

(a) One of the following: PHI 2100 (Ancient Philosophy), PHI 5400 (Presocratic Philosophy), PHI 5410 (Plato), or PHI 5420 (Aristotle); 
AND 
(b) One of the following: PHI 2110 (17th & 18th Century Philosophy), PHI 5440 (Continental Rationalism), PHI 5450 (British Empiricism), or PHI 5460 (Kant);

(2) One course from the Theory of Value Group;
(3) One course from the Philosophical Problems Group; and
(4) Three courses at the 5000-level or above (other than PHI 5993).

In addition:

(5) A major in Philosophy must register for PHI 5993 (Writing Intensive Course in Philosophy) in association with some 3000- or 5000-level Philosophy course; this course is not counted toward the nine-course minimum.
(6) During the semester in which application for graduation is made, a philosophy major must deliver to the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Philosophy a copy (preferably a graded copy) of a paper written for a Philosophy class that he or she believes is his or her best work.

NOTE: Rather than taking a 2000- or 3000-level course in satisfying the Theory of Value Requirement or the Philosophical Problems Requirement, a student may take a 5000-level course from the same group instead; however, the student should consult the instructor before doing so. Courses taken at the 5000-level which are used to satisfy any of the other requirements may also be used to satisfy the "three 5000-level courses"-requirement, though the nine course minimum must still be met. 
 

Foundations of Law and Ethics Concentration

This option is intended for students who have a special interest in ethical issues or in Law.

A candidate pursuing this concentration must complete a minimum of nine (9) courses in Philosophy, including the Core Course in symbolic logic (see above) and the following courses or selections from course groups:

(1) One course in the History of Philosophy Group from among the following courses: PHI 2100 (Ancient Philosophy), PHI 5400 (Presocratic Philosophy), PHI 5410 (Plato), PHI 5420 (Aristotle), PHI 2110 (17th & 18th Century Philosophy), PHI 5440 (Continental Rationalism), PHI 5450 (British Empiricism), or PHI 5460 (Kant);
(2) One course from the Philosophical Problems Group;
(3) PHI 2320 (Introduction to Ethics);
(4) Either PHI 3270 (Foundations of Law) or PHI 2330 (Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy), or any other Philosophy course at the 3000-level or above in the Philosophy of Law or Human Rights.
(5) One of the following courses: PHI 1100 (Contemporary Moral Issues), PHI 1110 (Ethical Issues in Health Care), PHI 1120 (Professional Ethics), or PHI 1130 (Environmental Ethics); and 
(6) Three courses at the 5000-level or above (other than PHI 5993).

In addition:

(7) A major in Philosophy must register for PHI 5993 (Writing Intensive Course in Philosophy) in association with some 3000- or 5000-level Philosophy course; this course is not counted toward the nine-course minimum.
(8) During the semester in which application for graduation is made, a philosophy major must deliver to the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Philosophy a copy (preferably a graded copy) of a paper written for a Philosophy class that he or she believes is his or her best work.

 

The Honors Program in Philosophy

Admission to the honors program in Philosophy is determined on the basis of the student's overall record. The student will normally be required to have:

  • a minimum honor point average of 3.3,
  • credit in at least three philosophy courses, and
  • a "B" or better average in philosophy courses.

To remain in the Philosophy Honors Program, the student must maintain a B or better average in philosophy courses.

Honors Requirements: To receive an Honors Degree in Philosophy, the candidate must:

  • Complete the course requirements for the regular major in Philosophy (in either concentration).
  • PHI 4870 (Honors Directed Reading) and PHI 4890 (Honors Proseminar), to be taken in the candidate's senior year, which will culminate in the writing of an Honors Essay on a topic to be chosen by the candidate in consultation with his/her instructor in PHI 4870
  • Complete a 4000-level course offered through the Honors Program
  • Accumulate at least fifteen (15) credits in honors-designated course work, including PHI 4870, PHI 4890, and the 4000-level Honors Program Seminar.

At graduation, the overall honor point average must be at least 3.3. If at any point, the student fails to maintain Honors standards, his or her credits will automatically be counted towards the regular major in Philosophy.

You might also wish to consult the University's Honors Program's web site
 
 

The Minor in Philosophy

A candidate for a minor in Philosophy must complete a minimum of five (5) courses in Philosophy, including the following courses or selections from course groups:

(1)  Symbolic Logic (PHI 2850, PHI 1860, or PHI 5050) or Critical Thinking (PHI 1050);
(2)  one course at the 5000-level or above (other than PHI 5993); and
(3)  three additional courses of the candidate's choice (other than 5993), at least one of which must be at the 2000-level. 
 

NOTE: Courses taken in compliance with requirement (1) may be used to satisfy any of requirement (2), though the five course minimum must still be met. Students wishing to do this must consult with the instructor.
 

Recommended Specialized Minors

The Philosophy Department offers several recommended tracks for satisfying the above Minor requirements, which are intended for students who are interested in Philosophy but who also have more specific or specialized academic interests or career goals. The Department currently offers thre recommended minor tracks:

  • Pre-Law
  • Ethics for Health Care Professionals
  • Foundations of Science and Psychology
     

Pre-Law Philosophy Minor

The recommended Pre-Law Philosophy Minor involves completing the above Minor requirements in the following way:

(1)  Symbolic Logic (PHI 2850, PHI 1860, or PHI 5050);
(2)  any TWO of the following courses: Introduction to Ethics (PHI 2320), Foundations of Law (
PHI 3270), Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy (PHI 2330), Philosophy of Law (PHI 5270), or Special Topics in Social and Political Philosophy (PHI 5240);
(3)  any one of the following courses: PHI 1110 (Contemporary Moral Issues), PHI 1110 (Ethical Issues in Health Care), PHI 1120 (Professional Ethics), or PHI 1130 (Environemental Ethics);
(4) One Philosophy course at the 5000-level.


Ethics for Health Care Professionals Philosophy Minor

The recommended Ethics for Health Care Professionals Philosophy Minor involves completing the above Minor requirements in the following way:

(1)  Symbolic Logic (PHI 2850, PHI 1860, or PHI 5050) or Critical Thinking (PHI 1050);
(2)  Ethical Issues in Health Care (PHI 1110);
(3)  Introduction to Ethics (PHI 2320);
(4)  Life and Death (PHI 1200) or an additional course from the Theory of Value Course Group; and 
(5)  one Philosophy course at the 5000-level.


Foundations of Science and Psychology Philosophy Minor

The Recommended Foundations of Science and Psychology Philosophy Minor involves completing the above Minor requirements in the following way:

(1)  Symbolic Logic (PHI 2850, PHI 1860, or PHI 5050) or Critical Thinking (PHI 1050);
(2)  any THREE of the following courses: Introduction to Philosophy of Science (PHI 2550), Philosophy of Psychology (PHI 2650), Theory of Knowledge (PHI 3500), Metaphysics (PHI 3550), Space, Time, and the Philosophy of Physics (PHI 3600), Philosophy of Science (PHI 5230), Topics in Metaphysics (PHI 5500), Topics in Epistemology (PHI 5530), or Philosophy of Mind (PHI 5550); and

(3)  one Philosophy course at the 5000-level.

 

 

AGRADE in Philosophy

The Accelerated Graduate Enrollment (AGRADE) program in Philosophy enables qualified seniors to enroll simultaneously in the undergraduate and graduate program. Students may elect a minimum of three (3) and a maximum of sixteen AGRADE credit hours, which will be used both to complete the baccalaureate degree as well as to serve as the beginning of graduate study. 

Students will receive undergraduate tuition rates for the AGRADE graduate course credits that they complete as an undergraduate. Because the Masters Program in Philosophy requires 32 total credits, this amounts to as much as a 50% tuition reduction for the Masters degree.

For further information about the program, eligibility, and instructions for how to apply, please consult the Philosophy Department's AGRADE Guidelines.

 

Contact

For questions concerning the Undergraduate Major, Minor, or Honors Programs, please contact the Department's Director of Undergraduate Studies:
 
Professor Josh Wilburn
5057 Woodward, Room #12002.23
(313)-577-6103

 

 

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