Geology Programs

The Geology program consists of a traditional core curriculum with electives that are primarily in the realm of Environmental Science. Candidates for the B.A. and B.S. degrees in Geology must complete 120 credits of course work including satisfaction of the College Group Requirements and the University General Education Requirements, in addition to the Geology major requirements. Most upper level courses involve both a laboratory and a field component. Students are required to satisfactorily complete a Writing Intensive Course, and to complete 6 credits of Geology Field Camp for the B.S. degree or 2 credits of Geology Field Camp for the B.A. degree.

Students are encouraged to use Degree Works to track their current degree progress. Degree Works can be accessed via Academica (a.wayne.edu) beneath the Student Resources tab. Additional information about Degree Works can be found here: wayne.edu/degreeworks.

Degree Works is NOT a substitution for seeing your Academic Advisor.

Students are expected to see their Advisor at least once per semester to track their degree progress and to address any concerns they may have about how courses are categorized within Degree Works. 


Degree Requirements

B.S., Degree Requirements

B.A., Degree Requirements

General Education Requirements

Graduate in 4-Years Plan


Choosing the Best Electives for Your Career Interests

Career Interest: Energy (Coal, Oil, Gas, and other energy sources) 

  • GEL 3450 - Principles of Paleontology 
  • GEL 5120 - Environmental Geochemistry 
  • GEL 5210 - Applied Geophysics 
  • GEL 5450 - Hydrogeology
  • GEL 6500 - Economic Geology  

Career Interest: Environmental Geology 

  • GEL 3100 - Environmental Systems Analysis 
  • GEL 4400 - HAZWOPER Training
  • GEL 5000 - Geologic Site Assessment 
  • GEL 5450 - Hydrogeology 
  • GEL 5120 - Environmental Geochemistry 
  • GEL 5510 - Environmental Fate & Transport of Pollutants 

*Students interested in this career path may want to consider a dual-major or dual-degree option with Biology or Environmental Science; see your advisor for more information. 

Career Interest: Geologic Mapping

  • GEL 5000 - Geologic Site Assessment 
  • GEL 5210 - Applied Geophysics 
  • GEL 5600 - Special Topics in Geology (Applied Geologic Mapping) 

*Students interested in this career path may want to consider options in Geography as well.

Career Interest: Hazards

  • GEL 4200 - Geomorphology
  • GEL 4400 - HAZWOPER Training
  • GEL 5000 - Geologic Site Assessment 
  • GEL 5120 - Environmental Geochemistry 

Career Interest: Minerals 

  • GEL 5120 - Environmental Geochemistry 
  • GEL 5600 - Special Topics in Geology (Applied Geologic Mapping)
  • GEL 6500 - Economic Geology 

Career Interest: Planetary Sciences

  • GEL 4200 - Geomorphology 
  • GEL 5600 - Special Topics in Geology (Applied Geologic Mapping)
  • GEL 5120 - Environmental Geochemistry 

*Students interested in this career path may want to consider options in Astronomy as well. 

Career Interest: Education

  • GEL 5030 - Earth Science for Educators (required for CoE students) 

*Students interested in this career path may want to consider a dual-degree option in the College of Education. 

Want more information on how to connect your major and intended career path? If so, click here


Preparing for Geology Field Camp 

Geology Field Camp Directory (from Geology.com) 

Articles to Read Before Applying to Field Camps

  1. Why Should I Study Geology in the Field? (Lee Suttner, Indiana University) 
  2. What to Expect at Geology Field Camp? (Emily Ferré and Eric Ferré, Southern Illinois University) 
  3. How to Choose a Geology Field Course (David Rodgers, Idaho State University)

Some things to look for/consider when choosing your field camp experience include: 

  • Have you completed all (or most of) your prerequisite coursework (i.e., Mineralogy, Petrology, Sed-Strat, and Structural Geology)?
  • Is the course at least 6-credit hours (required for the B.S. degree) or 2-credit hours (for a B.A. degree)?
  • Does that camp have expert instructors for each particular focus area?
  • Are digital map-making exercises included (this is the future)?
  • Does the camp involve real map-making, or just a series of mapping exercises? 
  • How physically demanding is the camp?
  • Will you stay in a base camp or at different college residences?
  • Do they have scholarships to help reduce costs?
  • Are there employment opportunities (e.g., van driver) to help reduce costs?
  • Does the camp have any special focus you're interested in (e.g., hydrogeology, geophysics, petroleum geology, etc.)? 
  • Time that the field camp is scheduled (you may be away for a month or more) 
    • Some camps allow for family visits, some do not. 
  • If electing to attend a less-commonly visited field camp, be sure to check with the faculty ahead of time to make sure it will count for your degree.

Scholarships that can be applied towards field camp expenses have been offered by the National Association of Geoscience Teachers and the Association of Environmental & Engineering Geologists. In addition, many of the schools listed below have financial assistance that applies to their own students. 

 

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